The Airfield

Seething Airfield was home to B24 Liberators of the American Airforce and its construction of was a huge feat of civil engineering.

It was a self contained village in its own right.

After the War

The Control Tower after the War

The base was returned to original local landowners after the war, as was much of the land which had been requisitioned by the British Government for airfield construction.

In the early 1960’s the Waveney Flying Group was formed. The group leased, and later purchased, the land forming the current airfield from the local farmer. The aim of the group was to bring the airfield back to life.

The Tower, located at the entrance to the airfield, stood untouched for a number of years. In the early 1980’s a team of determined and dedicated people formed the “Station 146 Tower Association”.

Key drivers of this project included Mike Page, Ralph Whitehead and Judy Speed (from the Wavney Flying Group) and Ron Everson and Jim Turner (From Seething village). The aim of the group was to restore the tower and keep its history alive.

Field Marks show the runway positions in today's crops.

Restoration work on the tower continues to this day. An example of this is the project to rebuild the weather observatory. In wartime photographs, a greenhouse structure can be seen on top of the tower. This was the weather observatory. The team researched its size, materials, colours to create what can be seen today. Inside the tower, you will find a variety of exhibits and displays illustrating what life was like at Seething airfield during the wartime years.


Copyright © 2012 Station 146 Tower Association. Website Design: Aeroclicks